Suffield Connecticut, in northern Connecticut, sits on the banks of the Connecticut River.   John Pynchon and a committee of influential members met in January 1670 and drew up the basic guidelines for the establishment of this new town. In 1675, 37 families that had settled in Suffield fled after conflicts with Native Americans during the King Phillip War.  The following year, the town was resettled.   Suffield has long been an agricultural town, growing tobacco and other crops.  A number of brooks were used for mills, gristmills, sawmills and paper mills. Suffield remained a Massachusetts town until 1749 when it became a part of Connecticut. Suffield was, for most of its history, primarily a small agriculturally based town.